David IS Adapting to Changing Conditions … Update #9

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***** Update #9: Monday, December 17, 2011: *****

Finished the oral antibiotics, and I’m feeling much better. πŸ™‚

I had my second post-operative doctor visit Thursday, December 15, and he removed all but two stitches in each of the incisions. Of course I had been systematically removing them (2/day for five days prior) on the incision at the knee. I removed the final two from the knee yesterday, and I put on my prosthetic today, for the first time since the surgery. The next visit is scheduled for Thursday, December 22, and he will remove the remaining 2 stitches from my foot.

I walked a bit today, both the knee and I felt weak, but the strength will come back soon. πŸ™‚

Though I’m a bit apprehensive about the results, I will be weighing-in Monday.

My sinerest gratitude for all of your support and warmest regards,

David

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David IS Adapting to Changing Conditions … Update #8

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***** Update #8: Monday, December 5, 2011: *****

Infection is gone; I’m on a one week course of oral antibiotics as a post-surgery precaution. πŸ™‚

I just had my first post-operative doctor visit and dressing change, and both incisions look great. The next visit is scheduled for 10 days, and he will be removing every other stitch from the incision. He expects to remove them all the following week, so I will be walking sans crutches by Christmas πŸ™‚

After the doctor visit, I went to the infusion center where I turned in the IV pump, and they removed the PICC line. πŸ™‚

All-in-All quite a wonderful way to start the day and week.

My sincerest gratitude for all of your support and my warmest regards,

David

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David IS Adapting to Changing Conditions … Update #7

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***** Update #7: Sunday, December 4, 2011: *****

Operation was a success, and the pathology came back negative for remaining infection. πŸ™‚

So what did they do? On my left foot they cut out a section of bone in the second metatarsal. The incision is sort of a “keyhole”; they cut out some dead tissue/callous, cleaned and closed the incision. I had a “diabetic ulcer” on the outside of my right knee, probably due to an ill-fitting prosthetic socket and too much activity. They opened it with a 5-6″ straight incision. Although the ulcer was only about the size of a quarter, the underlying tissue becomes undermined. They cut out some dead tissue/callous, cleaned and closed the incision. I’ll probably have a pretty cool looking scar.

I’m not sure how long the recovery will take, but I can only walk with crutches, and I’ve been advised to do this as little as possible for now. I am anxious to get back to the gym.

My sinerest gratitude for all of your support and warmest regards,

David

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David IS Adapting to Changing Conditions … Update #6

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***** Update #6: Monday, November 28, 2011: *****

After consulting with the doctors, I have decided to have the surgery on my foot; I’ll be going for the pre-op physical tomorrow, the surgery is scheduled for Wednesday. While they’re doing the work on the left foot, they’ll also be cleaning out my right knee. After 10 years of prosthetic use there is a little debris in the joint that’s been causing me some pain. I figure if I’m going to be laid up for the foot, I may as well take care of both issues at the same time.

I’m not sure how long I’ll be laid up, but I’ll only be in the hospital one night. Hopefully the recovery will be quick, and I’ll be able to get back on track.

Regards,

David

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David IS Adapting to Changing Conditions … Update #5

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***** Update #5: Tuesday, November 15, 2011: *****

This post is a summary of my current condition and treatments (undergoing and potential) as it relates to my left foot:

  • I have a condition called Charcot
  • in the foot; this condition is not curable; however it is treatable.

  • I have an open wound on the bottom of my foot at ball of the second toe; this wound has exposed the bone to possible infection. The IV antibiotics has killed the infection in the soft tissue, but it remains unclear if the infection has entered or is still in the bone.
  • The downward pressure of the bone (due to the Charcot) is inhibiting the healing of the wound; thus increasing the potential for additional infections once the IV antibiotic treatment is completed.

So in summary, a different course of action is required, both in the short-term (for healing the wound) and in the long-term for treating the Charcot and reducing the potential for additional inflammation / infection due to bone instability/movement.

So, what am I going to do? After conferring with the 3 doctors, I have decided to have surgery to remove a section of bone from my foot. I expect to schedule this for as soon as possible after Thanksgiving. While recovering I won’t be able to put any weight on the foot … No workouts for awhile, and never deadlift again.

After I heal from that surgery, we’ll again discuss the remaining options for the foot; though none appear very good, there will be reduced urgency.

Que sera sera.

Regards,

David

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David IS Adapting to Changing Conditions … Update #4

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***** Update #4: Wedesday, October 19, 2011: *****

I was at the hospital this morning at 7:30am for the PICC Line insertion; this is a long-term vein tap for the administration of intra-veinous medication…in my case antibiotics. It’s pretty amazing; they inserted a long tube into a vein in my upper arm from just above my right elbow to my heart. This will stay in place for 4-6 weeks, depending upon the healing progress. The procedure took less than 5 minutes, but the process from admission to discharge took a bit over 4 hours.

After discharge from the hospital, I walked across the street to the infusion center where they set up the mobile IV pump and got me started on the first dose of antibiotics. The computerized pump is programmed to give me a dose of antibiotic every 8 hours while the IV maintains a continuous drip of saline. I’ll be going to the infusion center Monday-Friday; on Fridays they’ll give me sufficient dosage to last all weekend.

After confering with the doctor, the IV nurse and the nurse at the infusion center, I will be on very limited exercise; I am not allowed to put strain on my chest because of the danger in dislodging the PICC line. So I can’t lift heavy, and push-ups are out of the question. I’ll have to figger sumthin’ out; exercise is critical to my glucose control.

Kindest regards,

David

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David IS Adapting to Changing Conditions … Update #3

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***** Update #3: Tuesday, October 18, 2011: *****

I had a follow-up visit with the doctor in the infectious disease department today, and indications point to a staph infection in the bone. Although the culture didn’t grow staph, there were two minor bacteria that mask the staph. So I’m in for a 4-6 week course of IV antibiotics starting tomorrow. I’ll be going to the hospital tomorrow at 7:30am for the insertion of the PIC Line; afterwards I’ll go to the infusion center for the IV pump, which I will wear continuously for the 4-6 week term. Currently they are saying I’ll have to come in each day for a new IV bag; however, the bag they give me on Fridays will be sufficient to last through the weekend. If they can do this, I am going to push for the higher volume bags during the week to cut down on the frequency of visits…we’ll see.

The good news is the oral antibiotics worked well against the infection in the tissue; we need the IV to attack the bone infection. The doctor is very confident (almost to the point of a lack of concern) that all will be well. He even indicated that with my improved glucose levels (more details to follow) I would be an excellent candidate to have reconstructive surgery on the foot to counteract the Charcot πŸ™‚ After we take care of the infection, I’ll look into this further.

Some general health info for those interested:

  • Blood Pressure: 126/78
  • Hemoglobin a1c: 5.3% – If he didn’t know I was diabetic, he wouldn’t even suspect it … This is in the normal range πŸ™‚
  • Cholesterol: Total-125, LDL-85, HDL-31, Triglycerides-50 … Conventional wisdom says the HDL is a bit low, but the ratio is good, and so am I.

I don’t have a baseline with which to compare these numbers, but I don’t believe these same numbers could be reconciled with the man in the photos from March 7. GO PRIMAL!

Kindest regards,

David

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